Star Wars and Following Your Path

With news about the new trailer for Star Wars:  The Force Awakens debuting this weekend, I’m amped up to get back into counting down to a new Star Wars film.  As with that, it’s a good reminder of the films that I know and love, which mainly is the original trilogy (not that I hate the prequels but I grew up on the original trilogy).

As I have from time to time here, I like to look at scenes from the films and reflect on them and the messages that they convey.  One that I recently have been pondering was from A New Hope.  The Rebels were gathered in their base on Yavin IV as they prepare to launch an assault on the oncoming Death Star.  Their hope was to destroy the space station before it could get in range to destroy the planet.

Luke Skywalker was prepared to fly into battle but before he left he tried to convince Han Solo to come with him.  At that point, Han was focused on collecting the reward for rescuing Princess Leia and getting him and Chewbacca out of there.  Luke was disappointed and left Han and Chewie.

As he was making his way to his X-Wing, Luke ran into Leia.  Here was the exchange:

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Leia:  “What’s wrong?”

Luke:  “It’s Han.  I don’t know.  I really thought he’d change his mind.”

Leia:  “He’s got to follow his own path.  No one can choose it for him.”

As much as Luke wanted Han to join in the fight for the rebellion, Luke couldn’t make Han do it.  Han chose the path in which he took.  Granted, he would join the fight at just the right time to help Luke out of a tough spot and would go on to join the Rebels in their fight against the Empire.  But he had to make that choice.

Many times, we interact with those we care about (either in person or in some cases a far through social media) and we feel like Luke.  We want them to come with us.  But as much as we want them to come with us, we can’t make them.  They have their own path to follow.  Sometimes, like Han, they do end up coming alongside.  Sometimes, though, they don’t.

When they don’t, it doesn’t mean we stop caring about them.  It does mean that we understand and still be there for them.  Who knows, they may surprise you like Han did.

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Sunday Devotional: Hebrews 4

“Since then we have a great high priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus, the Son of God, let us hold fast our confession.  For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin.  Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.”  Hebrews 4:14-16

We all want someone to appreciate and understand what we are going through.  When we struggle with hard times, we want someone can relate to us.  In this passage in Hebrews, the writer is reminding us that Jesus understands.  When he lived on this Earth, he was tempted and tried.  He was mocked and ridiculed.  He was hurt by those he considered his friends.  He felt sorrow and grief.  He knows what we are going through.  Even better, because of the work He did on the cross to be the sacrifice to pay for our sins, we can come to him in confidence that we can receive grace and mercy.  We also can go to him with our needs, with our hurts and know that he will listen and he will care.  What do you need to take to Him today?  Do so and know that He loves you and knows what you’re going through.